Discovering Great Mormon Buildings

All Others

Randolph Ward Chapel Interior

Even though many people classify this building as a Tabernacle, I have not, because from what I have read, it has always only been a meetinghouse for the local ward. The interior of this building features one of my favorite set of pipes for an organ that I have seen. Very minimal and unusual in that they point downwards.

Built between 1898 and 1914, the first meeting was held in the main Chapel in November 1904 when the building was not finished, but usable. Another ten years would pass before the building was completed. Apostle George A. Smith stopped the work until all debts were paid which greatly slowed down the work. Smith would later dedicate the building on July 26, 1914.

The plaque on the building says it was remodeled in 1938. At this time an amusement hall was added behind the building while a baptismal font and furnace were installed in the basement of the original building. Total time for this remodel spanned from 1936-38. The amusement hall was demolished in a 1984-85 remodel and a large rear addition was built with a new cultural hall, classrooms and offices. The addition attached to the original Chapel at the rear and on one side providing a new entrance lobby and hallway to access the entry to the Chapel. The Chapel was also refurbished at this time.

15 S. Main
Randolph, UT
Built 1898-1914
Architect: John C. Gray
National Register of Historic Places
Map Location of Building


Centerville 1st Ward Chapel Interior

160 S 300 E
Centerville, UT
Built 1879
Map Location of Building


Centerville 1st Ward Exterior

160 S 300 E
Centerville, UT
Built 1879
Side wings added 1927
Front portico and steps added 1934
Cultural Hall and Steeple added 1951
Map Location of Building


Centerville 1st Ward Cultural Hall


The exposed structural framework here is quite striking. Built in 1951 and dedicated by Assistant to the Twelve, Alma Sonne, on March 1, 1953.

160 S 300 E
Centerville, UT
Cultural Hall built 1951
Architect: George Cannon Young
Map Location of Building


Washakie Ward Chapel Interior


Although the building was locked, one of the exterior windows was broken which provided a view to the interior. Obviously it is in rough shape, but I was quite surprised to see that the pews still remain in the Chapel.

Box Elder County
Washakie, UT
Architect: Edward O Anderson (probable)
Built 1937-39; Sold 1966; Currently vacant
National Register of Historic Places
Map Location of Building


Washakie Ward Exterior

Repeated conflicts between the Native Shoshoni Indians settled near the Bear River and the local militia led to a treaty in 1863 that forever changed the lifestyle of the Shoshoni. As a result, the LDS Church decided to set up a community named Washakie near the Utah/Idaho border in 1880 in order to teach “white” farming techniques and to help integrate the Shoshoni into both American and Mormon society. Using missionaries to direct this effort, by 1886, 250 inhabitants lived here year-round, owning their property in common and maintaining their farms and homesteads.

Construction on the small Washakie Ward Chapel began in 1937 and sits in the middle of a large fenced lot. Dedicated on January 22, 1939, the building served this local Shoshoni farming settlement that consisted of about 125 LDS members by this time. Upon completion of the building, the first all-Native American Indian bishopric in the Church was installed to lead the ward with Moroni Timbimboo as Bishop. Out-migration from the community began with WWII and continued until 1960 when the Ward was downgraded to a Branch. In 1966 the congregation was completely discontinued and the building and property were sold. Not just the LDS chapel, but the entire community project was abandoned at this time, with all the remaining families evicted and all 184 acres of property either returned to the tribe or sold. The small brick chapel is the most significant of only a few remaining structures from this community that remains. In 1998 the building, still vacant and in disrepair, was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

*Source of information obtained from National Register Nomination Form

Box Elder County
Washakie, UT
Architect: Edward O Anderson (probable)
Built 1937-39; Sold 1966; Currently vacant
National Register of Historic Places
Map Location of Building


Parowan 3rd Ward Exterior

90 S Main
Parowan, UT
Architect: Miles Miller
Built 1914
Map Location of Building


Parowan 3rd Ward Windows

90 S Main
Parowan, UT
Architect: Miles Miller
Built 1914
Map Location of Building


Parowan 3rd Ward Chapel Interior

90 S Main
Parowan, UT
Architect: Miles Miller
Built 1914
Map Location of Building


Utah State Meetinghouse Rendering


“Architectural drawing of the LDS stake building, known colloquially as the ‘Golden Toaster,’ built in 1962.” (Image courtesy Special Collections & Archives, Merrill Library, Utah State University) This rendering was featured as the cover of the dedicatory program.

This meetinghouse, designed by James H McCrea, was built as the U.S.U. Stake Center, containing two chapels to accommodate four University wards, the USU First, Fifth, Seventh and Eighth wards. Groundbreaking occurred on May 2, 1961 and was done by President David O Mckay. The event was shared with a groundbreaking for the Student Living Center on Campus, which would eventually be named in honor of President Mckay. All the speakers referred to how memorable and significant the occasion was. The building would eventually cost $700,000 to build. Dedication took place a year later, on Sunday June 3, 1962 with services under the direction of the Stake Presidency – Reed Bullen, Wendell O Rich, and Leonard J Arrington. Speaking at the event was University President Daryl Chase. President David O Mckay gave the final address and then offered the dedicatory prayer. At the end of the services a Hosannah anthem was sung followed by the singing of ‘The Spirit of God Like a Fire is Burning.’

This building is scheduled to be given to the University in exchange for another site, after which it will be demolished.

650 N 1200 E
Logan, UT
Built 1962
Architect: James H McCrea
Map Location of Building


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