Discovering Great Mormon Buildings

Archive for October, 2011

Hollywood Stake Tabernacle Window Detail


Cultural Hall Windows as seen from the internal courtyard.

1209 S Manhattan Pl
Los Angeles, CA
Built 1928
Architect: Pope and Burton
Map Location of Building


Hollywood Stake Tabernacle Steeple

1209 S Manhattan Pl
Los Angeles, CA
Built 1928
Architect: Pope and Burton
Map Location of Building


Hollywood Stake Tabernacle Exterior


Sunrise breaking through a foggy morning on one of the greatest buildings ever built by the LDS Church.

1209 S Manhattan Pl
Los Angeles, CA
Built 1928
Architect: Pope and Burton
Map Location of Building


Henderson 3rd Ward Courtyard Detail

303 S Cholla St
Henderson, NV
Built 1964
Architect: Dean Pierce
Map Location of Building


Henderson 3rd Ward Pulpit

303 S Cholla St
Henderson, NV
Built 1964
Architect: Dean Pierce
Map Location of Building


Henderson 3rd Ward Exterior Detail

303 S Cholla St
Henderson, NV
Built 1964
Architect: Dean Pierce
Map Location of Building


Henderson 3rd Ward Courtyard

303 S Cholla St
Henderson, NV
Built 1964
Architect: Dean Pierce
Map Location of Building


Henderson 3rd Ward Cultural Hall Exterior

303 S Cholla St
Henderson, NV
Built 1964
Architect: Dean Pierce
Map Location of Building


Las Vegas 9th Ward Artwork


By Norwegian LDS sculptor Torleif S. Knaphus, 1954

3400 W Charleston Blvd
Las Vegas, NV
Built 1961
Architect: Harold W Burton
Map Location of Building


Las Vegas 9th Ward Chapel Interior

3400 W Charleston Blvd
Las Vegas, NV
Built 1961
Architect: Harold W Burton
Map Location of Building


Las Vegas 9th Ward Entry

3400 W Charleston Blvd
Las Vegas, NV
Built 1961
Architect: Harold W Burton
Map Location of Building


Las Vegas 9th Ward Exterior

3400 W Charleston Blvd
Las Vegas, NV
Built 1961
Architect: Harold W Burton
Map Location of Building


Milwaukee Branch Rendering


(Image from Deseret News 03 Sep 1932)

A commenter on this site clued me in to this gorgeous old English style chapel that was the first LDS-built meetinghouse in Milwaukee. The triangular-shaped property was purchased during the Great Depression at the convergence of West Roosevelt Drive, West Leon Terrace Drive and North 44th Street. The members raised $33,534.33 for their building that was budgeted to cost $50,000. Local Wisconsin Lannon stone was secured for the exterior instead of the red brick that was in the original design. Construction began Aug 8, 1932 and was dedicated by President Heber J Grant on June 13, 1933. Seating capacity of the chapel was 400, with a social hall, dining room, kitchen and ten classrooms.

After over 50 years of use and with few members left in the area, the building was sold in 1986, but then repurchased and bought back in 1997 when growth to the area returned. After purchasing the building it was noted that even the church name remained in tile work above the main door. If anyone has pictures or can obtain good pictures of the interior and exterior of this building, I would be very interested in speaking with you.

4422 W Leon Terrace
Milwaukee, WI
Built 1932-33; Sold 1986; Purchased 1997
Map Location of Building


Manila YSA Ward Window

835 N 900 E
American Fork, UT
Map Location of Building


Manila YSA Ward Cultural Hall

835 N 900 E
American Fork, UT
Map Location of Building


Manila YSA Ward Chapel Interior


I’m not sure why so many of the pews have been removed, but there are a lot of chairs on both the right and left aisles that appear to be used in their place.

835 N 900 E
American Fork, UT
Map Location of Building


Manila YSA Ward Pulpit

835 N 900 E
American Fork, UT
Map Location of Building


Manila YSA Ward Pew

835 N 900 E
American Fork, UT
Map Location of Building


Manila YSA Ward Window

835 N 900 E
American Fork, UT
Map Location of Building


Manila YSA Ward Cultural Hall


Quite possibly the best Stage and Cultural Hall I have seen. I’m not sure why I didn’t close the curtains and sliding partitions, so I may have to go back.

835 N 900 E
American Fork, UT
Map Location of Building


Manila YSA Ward Exterior


This is definitely in my top five mid-century meetinghouses. The steeple is beautiful in its simplicity. And the repetition of structure and gabled windows is stunning. The chapel is directly across the street from a much newer meetinghouse and the American Fork Temple. I am unsure of the original name, date or architect, but hope to find out soon. If anyone has info, please share.

835 N 900 E
American Fork, UT
Map Location of Building


San Pedro Martir Ward Exterior


This meetinghouse was the first chapel built by the LDS Church in Mexico. Construction of the building took place in 1938 and was dedicated by Harold W. Pratt, who was President of the Mexican Mission, on May 22, 1938. The architectural style is Colonial Mexican. (Information and image graciously provided by Alfredo Villanueva)

Cinco de Mayo # 21
San Pedro Martir
Tlalpan, MEXICO
Built 1938
Map Location of Building


Wellsville Tabernacle Detail

75 S 100 E
Wellsville, UT
Built 1902-08
Architect: C.T. Barrett
Sold 1979 to city; now owned by Wellsville Foundation
National Register of Historic Places
Map Location of Building


Wellsville Tabernacle Exterior


This Gothic Revival tabernacle was built on a raised sandstone foundation. All of the building materials, including the lumber, rock, lime and brick are local to the valley. The total cost of the building was $65,000. Dedication of the building took place on June 28, 1908 by Anthon H Lund of the First Presidency.

The original red brick was painted white in the 1950′s. After a fire in 1959, the tower was lowered and the central spire reduced in size. The building was listed on the National Register in 1979, the same year it was sold by the Church to the city of Wellsville. (At the lower right of the photo you can see part of the new meetinghouse that was built in the 1970′s to replace this building when it was sold. The two buildings share the same city block.) Unable to financially support the building, by 1994 the City turned it over to a private group of concerned citizens, now called the Wellsville Foundation. Under their ownership, the building has been used for weddings, theater productions, family reunions and lectures.

In 2010 the building was closed to the public because of structural signs of failure with the roof. The cost to repair the still-closed building is $150,000, which the Foundation has been seeking to raise since this past August. If the Foundation can raise the money, the building will again be opened to community and public use. For more information, here is an informative article on the fundraising effort.

75 S 100 E
Wellsville, UT
Built 1902-08
Architect: C.T. Barrett
Sold 1979 to city; now owned by Wellsville Foundation
National Register of Historic Places
Map Location of Building


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